CiteULike: Studying Tags

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So here we are, at the end of another semester, and it’s time for me to look back at what I’ve done and reflect on the choices I’ve made. My focus here is on my CiteULike tags, which have created a natural and organic folksonomy as a reflection of how I think of articles.

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Tacit and Explicit once more: Types of Knowledge and Knowing

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I am blogging about Hara last because, to be honest, I really struggled with this book. There is just so much in it, and there’s so little I know about public defenders. But there was one section I came across that I had to write about: the three types of knowledge Hara presents. Hara writes that there is cultural knowledge, which he defines as “what it is like to be a member of a certain profession” (114); book knowledge, which is knowledge taken in from documents; and practical knowledge, which Hara states is knowing how to use book knowledge.
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The Trouble with Email

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It seems a little funny that, after commenting to rhugenwrites about emails I chose an article discussing just that: emails for communication. Pillet and Carillo even mention information overload in connection with emails. I found it most interesting that they referenced a trail which “revealed that when emails were completely turned-off, workers focused longer on their tasks, multitasked less, and experienced lower stress (Mark, Voida, Cardello, 2012)”. Mostly because I can absolutely believe it. Continue reading

Vague Notions and Missing Thoughts

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When you hear “Information Society”, what do you think of? Without any background, your mind might go to a club or an organization. You might think of something similar to the American Cancer Society or the Humane Society. That’s where my mind goes at least: to a group of people working with a common purpose. I knew that wasn’t exactly an information society, but that’s what it sounds like. Continue reading

Trust in the Workspace

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If you’ve ever been part of a “fire drill” (actual fire or otherwise), then you know how important it is to trust the instructions given to you by firemen. You don’t think or question, you just do what the fireman tells you.

This is the kind of trust Ibrahim is talking about when he discusses trust during major incidents in the oil industry. Continue reading

The Story of our Work

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A while back, hereticalpoetical wrote a post about knowledge transfer and social capital which started me thinking about how knowledge bounces around in the workplace. One of the key points she mentions is relationships and trust, which she continues in a later post, discussing how knowledge management is concerned with relationships. I’m going to go alongside that and say that knowledge transfer is greatly affected by stories.

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